Lower Your Cancer Risk: Try Some Vegetable Soup!

By Deb Dittner

Up until 2019, the cancer rate was declining. More than one million people are diagnosed with cancer yearly causing this to be the second-leading cause of death in the US.

One out of three women and one out of two men can expect to develop cancer during their lifetimes.

Statistics are not fully compiled from the past two years but in speaking with fellow health care providers and other resources, an increase in cancer has been noted.

Lowering your risk of developing cancer is achievable by maintaining a healthy and balanced lifestyle.

Choosing to eat whole nutrient-dense foods is a great way to begin. Incorporating anti-inflammatory foods such as dark green leafy vegetables, low-glycemic fruits, nuts and seeds need to become your friends. Reduce to eliminate processed white food-like products especially sugar (as this feeds cancer), hormone-laden dairy and animal products. A plant-based diet (preferably organic), needs to make up the main portion of your daily meals.

Juicing provides nutrients and hydration and can be considered medicinal. Stay away from store bought processed juices as these are high in sugar. Smoothies (especially green smoothies) are an easy way to get three servings of vegetables and one serving of fruit into your day.

One powerhouse for your nutrition is in adding mushrooms into your diet to provide beneficial nutrients including fiber, selenium, vitamins (ascorbic acid, vitamins B and D, niacin, thiamin and riboflavin) and antioxidants. Mushrooms contain antiviral, antitumor, and antimicrobial properties, protect the liver and cardiovascular system and boost the immune system.

Mushroom varieties to include are shiitake, white button, cremini, maitake and portobello to name a few. Eating just two mushrooms daily can possibly lower your risk of cancer by 45%.

But remember, mushrooms alone won’t do it. You need to incorporate this into your mostly plant-based diet.

Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in the US, but it is one of the most preventable. Those people at greater risk are older than 50, a positive family history, Type 2 diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease (including ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease), smokers, increased weight and consuming processed foods and red meats. Prevention is of most importance and starts with eating a high fiber, colorful diet to provide optimal support for gut health.

Winter months and cold weather cause your body to search for warm, hearty meals. Vegetable soup is a hearty food that provides much healthy nutrition.

Deborah Dittner is a family nurse practitioner and health consultant. Her mission is to transform as many individuals as possible through nutrition and lifestyle changes. For more information, check out her website at www.debdittner.com or contact her at 518-596-8565.
Deborah Dittner is a family nurse practitioner and health consultant. Her mission is to transform as many individuals as possible through nutrition and lifestyle changes.
For more information, check out her website at www.debdittner.com or contact her at 518-596-8565.